The River Duddon - A Series Of Sonnets, 1820. - I

A poem by William Wordsworth

Not envying Latian shades, if yet they throw
A grateful coolness round that crystal Spring,
Blandusia, prattling as when long ago
The Sabine Bard was moved her praise to sing;
Careless of flowers that in perennial blow
Round the moist marge of Persian fountains cling;
Heedless of Alpine torrents thundering
Through ice-built arches radiant as heaven's bow;
I seek the birthplace of a native Stream.
All hail, ye mountains! hail, thou morning light!
Better to breathe at large on this clear height
Than toil in needless sleep from dream to dream:
Pure flow the verse, pure, vigorous, free, and bright,
For Duddon, long-loved Duddon, is my theme!

Reader Comments

Tell us what you think of 'The River Duddon - A Series Of Sonnets, 1820. - I' by William Wordsworth

comments powered by Disqus

Home | Search | About this website | Contact | Privacy Policy