Poems by Lord George Gordon Byron

also known as: Lord Byron
George Gordon Byron

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When, to their airy hall, my Fathers' voice
Could I remount the river of my years
Which, in the Arabic language, is to the following purport[570]
Oh! little lock of golden hue
Animula! vagula, Blandula,
Since the refinement of this polish'd age
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"But if any old Lady, Knight, Priest, or Physician,
Dear simple girl, those flattering arts,
Canto First.
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Rosalind. Farewell, Monsieur Traveller; Look, you lisp, and wear strange suits: disable all the benefits of your own country; be out of love with your Nativity, and almost chide God for making you that countenance you are; or I will scarce think you
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Not in those climes where I have late been straying,
"I cannot but remember such things were,
A Fact Literally Rendered.[60]
In law an infant, [2] and in years a boy,
I had a dream, which was not all a dream.
Lady! if for the cold and cloudy clime
O blood and thunder! and oh blood and wounds!
When Bishop Berkeley said 'there was no matter,'
Ah! - What should follow slips from my reflection;
When amatory poets sing their loves
I want a hero: an uncommon want,
If from great nature's or our own abyss
Nothing so difficult as a beginning
O, Wellington! (or 'Villainton' - for Fame
O ye! who teach the ingenuous youth of nations,
The world is full of orphans: firstly, those
O Love! O Glory! what are ye who fly
The antique Persians taught three useful things,
'There is a tide in the affairs of men
When Newton saw an apple fall, he found
Hail, Muse! et cetera. - We left Juan sleeping,
I now mean to be serious; - it is time,
Of all the barbarous middle ages, that
Bob Southey! You're a poet, poet laureate,
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"It is the voice of years, that are gone! they roll before me, with all their deeds."
"I had rather be a kitten, and cry, mew!
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{Greek: Astaer prin men elampes eni tsuoisin hepsos.}
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First published in Moore's 'Letters and Journals of Lord Byron', 1830, i. 56
[Greek: Maedam o panta nem_on, K.T.L_] [1]
Introduction To Francesca Of Rimini.
[Greek: Mesonuktiois poth hopais, k.t.l.] [1]
[Greek: Argureais logchaisi machou kai panta krataeseo.] [1]
---- "Ergo fungar vice cotis, acutum
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Oh! might I kiss those eyes of fire,
Oh! might I kiss those eyes of fire,
Cruel Cerinthus! does the fell disease
When some proud son of man returns to earth,
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As the author was discharging his Pistols in a Garden, Two Ladies passing near the spot were alarmed by the sound of a Bullet hissing near them, to one of whom the following stanzas were addressed the next morning. [2]
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And thou wert sad - yet I was not with thee;
Spot of my youth! whose hoary branches sigh,
"Away, away, - your flattering arts
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QUESTION.
[Greek: Aeì d' aeí me pheugei.] - [Pseud.] ANACREON, [Greek: Eis chruson].
Introduction To Mazeppa
When the last sunshine of expiring Day
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Motto.
Where are those honours, IDA! once your own,
Oh! mihi præteritos referat si Jupiter annos.[1]
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Through the cracks in these battlements loud the winds whistle,
Why dost thou build the hall, Son of the winged days? Thou lookest from thy tower to-day: yet a few years, and the blast of the desart comes: it howls in thy empty court.-OSSIAN. [1]
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In this belovéd marble view
"Our Nation's foes lament on Fox's death,
Anne's Eye is liken'd to the Sun,
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Oh! thou that roll'st above thy glorious Fire,
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The Moralists tell us that Loving is Sinning,
'Tis done! - I saw it in my dreams:
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'Twas now the noon of night, and all was still,
Sonetto composto in nome di un genitore, a cui era motta poco innanzi una figlia appena maritata: e diretto al genitore della sacra sposa.
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Eternal Spirit of the chainless Mind![1]
A noble Lady of the Italian shore
Rousseau - Voltaire - our Gibbon - and De Staël -
To be the father of the fatherless,
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"Nimium ne crede colori." - Virgil, [Ecl. ii. 17]
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- "Pallas te hoc vulnere, Pallas
Dear are the days of youth! Age dwells on their remembrance through the mist of time. In the twilight he recalls the sunny hours of morn. He lifts his spear with trembling hand. "Not thus feebly did I raise the steel before my fathers!" Past is the r
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Nisus, the guardian of the portal, stood,
Greek:
"And Ireland, like a bastinadoed elephant, kneeling to receive the paltry rider." - [Life of Curran, ii. 336.]
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Introduction To The Lament Of Tasso.
Canto The First.
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Canto The First.
O lachrymarum fons, tenero sacros
Introduction To The Vision Of Judgment.
Introduction To 'The Waltz'
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High in the midst, surrounded by his peers,
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Sweet girl! though only once we met,
Rail on, Rail on, ye heartless crew!
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These locks, which fondly thus entwine,
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Let Folly smile, to view the names
"Nil ego contulerim jucundo sanus amico." - HORACE.
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Since now the hour is come at last,
MARION! why that pensive brow?
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Dorset! whose early steps with mine have stray'd,
Tu semper amoris
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Woman! experience might have told me
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[Greek: Eis rodon.]
[Greek: Thelo legein Atpeidas, k.t.l.] [1]
Equal to Jove that youth must be -
Ye Cupids droop each little head,
Ye Cupids, droop each little head,
Justum et tenacem propositi virum.
[Greek: Erotes hyper men agan, K.T.L.[1]]
Sonnet composed in the name of a father, whose daughter had recently died shortly after her marriage; and addressed to the father of her who had lately taken the veil.
He who, sublime, in epic numbers roll'd,
'Tis midnight - but it is not dark
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