Lines Upon Hearing Miss ---- Sing At An Evening Party. The Nightingale's Complaint.

A poem by John Carr

The Moon had bespangled the murmuring wave,
The dew-drop had moisten'd the moss of the cave,
The summer night-breeze, like a sigh, was just heard,
When thus flow'd the strains of the dark-warbling bird:

"I hear a strange melody breathe thro' the grove,
Now swelling with joy, and now melting with love;
Tho' sweet is the sound, yet it should not invade,
Unbidden, my lonely dominion of shade.

"As long as the stars that now twinkle shall shine,
This willow's my throne, and all nature is mine:
Perchance 'tis the breeze on your desolate lute;
Its strings are now sighing, so long that were mute.

"Ah! no, silly bird that I am! shall I grieve?
Shall Envy alarm, and shall Folly deceive?
'Tis the voice of Eliza! I hear it again,
Enraptur'd I hear it, nor envy the strain."
Then Philomel flutter'd with tremulous wing
To Eliza - more happy to listen than sing!

Reader Comments

Tell us what you think of 'Lines Upon Hearing Miss ---- Sing At An Evening Party. The Nightingale's Complaint.' by John Carr

comments powered by Disqus

Home | Search | About this website | Contact | Privacy Policy