Bonnie George Campbell

A poem by Frank Sidgwick

The Text is from Motherwell's Minstrelsy, pp. 44-5.


The Story.--Motherwell says it 'is probably a lament for one of the adherents of the house of Argyle, who fell in the battle of Glenlivat, stricken on Thursday, the third day of October, 1594 years.' Another suggestion is that it refers to a Campbell of Calder killed in a feud with Campbell of Ardkinglas, the murder being the result of the same conspiracy which brought the Bonny Earl of Murray to his death. Another version of the ballad, however, gives the name as James, and it is useless and unnecessary to particularise.


BONNIE GEORGE CAMPBELL

1.
Hie upon Hielands
And low upon Tay,
Bonnie George Campbell
Rade out on a day.
Saddled and bridled
And gallant rade he;
Hame came his gude horse,
But never cam he!

2.
Out cam his auld mither
Greeting fu' sair,
And out cam his bonnie bride
Rivin' her hair.
Saddled and bridled
And booted rade he;
Toom hame cam the saddle,
But never cam he!

3.
'My meadow lies green,
And my corn is unshorn;
My barn is to big,
And my babie's unborn.'
Saddled and bridled
And booted rade he;
Toom hame cam the saddle,
But never cam he!

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